Look To Alumni For a Helping Hand

Earlier this week I updated the Lyndon State Alumni section on Broadcastmet.com. With the help of Tim Lewis, co-chair of the Electronic Journalism Arts program at Lyndon State College, I was able to track down 46 broadcast meteorologists. I attached links to their local television news profiles, and their Twitter accounts where I could find them. I think its interesting to look back and see how past graduates have done and hopefully your meteorology program keeps track of alumni as well. Alumni are be a valuable resource.

With social media, we are now connected more than ever, and a network of alumni can be a great asset for looking for job opportunities or just asking for some advice. Every  broadcast meteorologist likely had some help from someone who has come before them. I’ve found that most veteran mets are usually willing to offer some assistance to the new broadcasters coming up the pipe.

A broadcast meteorology program with a long list of successful alumni will not guarantee you a good job after college, and knowing someone who works somewhere doesn’t always get you an ‘in’. It will always come down to whats on your resume tape, but having a strong network of alumni who are willing to point you in the right direction can be just the edge you need.

If you are looking into going to school for broadcast meteorology, ask to see a list of where past broadcast mets have gotten jobs. Knowing that the program is producing meteorologists that are currently working in the field and doing well is a good sign. If you have a favorite local tv met, go online and check out their biography to see where they went to college. You’ll usually find that alumni are the best advocates for the programs they graduated from.

Alumni have been there. They’ve taken the classes, eaten the dining hall food, and know what you are going through. They also graduated, got a job and moved on. Eventually you’ll be doing the same. Look to alumni when you are having a tough time and need some objective advice. Just be sure to pay it back to someone else when you are the one with the nice broadcast meteorology job.

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